Research

Computational Psychiatry & Decision-making

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Abstracts

  • The neural basis of aversive Pavlovian guidance during planning
  • Lally* N, Huys* QJM, Eshel N, Faulkner P, Dayan P and Roiser JP
  • J. Neurosci. (2017) In Press
  • Important real-world decisions are often arduous as they frequently involve sequences of choices, with initial selections affecting future options. Evaluating every possible combination of choices is computationally intractable, particularly for longer multi-step decisions. Therefore, humans frequently employ heuristics to reduce the complexity of decisions. We recently used a goal-directed planning task to demonstrate the profound behavioral influence and ubiquity of one such shortcut, namely aversive pruning, a reflexive Pavlovian process that involves neglecting parts of the decision space residing beyond salient negative outcomes. However, how the brain implements this important decision heuristic, and what underlies individual differences in its strength have hitherto remained unanswered. Therefore, we administered an adapted version of the same planning task to healthy volunteers undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine the neural basis of aversive pruning. Through both computational and standard categorical fMRI analyses, we show that when planning was influenced by aversive pruning, the subgenual cingulate cortex was robustly recruited. This neural signature was distinct from those associated with general planning and valuation, two fundamental cognitive components elicited by our task but which are complementary to aversive pruning. Furthermore, we found that individual variation in levels of aversive pruning were associated with the responses of insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to the receipt of large monetary losses, and also with sub-clinical levels of anxiety. In summary, our data reveal the neural signatures of an important reflexive Pavlovian processes that shapes goal-directed evaluations, and thereby determine the outcome of high-level sequential cognitive processes.