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Computational Psychiatry & Decision-making

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Abstracts

  • doi pdf The specificity of Pavlovian regulation is associated with recovery from depression
  • Huys QJM, Gölzer M, Friedel E, Heinz A, Cools R, Dayan P and Dolan RJ
  • Psychological Medicine (2016) 46(5):1027-1035
  • Background: Changes in reflexive emotional responses are hallmarks of depression, but how emotional reflexes impact on adaptive decision-making in depression has not been examined formally. Using a Pavlovian-Instrumental Transfer (PIT) task, we compared the influence of affectively valenced stimuli on decision-making in depression and generalized anxiety disorder compared with healthy controls; and related this to the longitudinal course of the illness.

    Methods: Fourty subjects with a current DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Generalised Anxiety Disorder or a combination thereof, and 40 matched healthy controls performed a Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT) task that assesses how instrumental approach and withdrawal behaviours are influenced by appetitive and aversive Pavlovian conditioned stimuli. Patients were followed up after 4-6 months. Analyses focussed on patients with depression alone (n=25).

    Results: In healthy controls, Pavlovian conditioned stimuli (CSs) exerted action-specific effects, with appetitive CSs boosting active approach and aversive CSs withdrawal. This action-specificity was absent in currently depressed subjects. Greater action-specificity in patients was associated with better recovery over the follow-up period.

    Conclusions: Depression is associated with abnormal influence of emotional reactions on decision-making in a way that is predictive of recovery.